More Resources Needed for Neighbourhood Policing

18 February 2016

Officer helping membre of the public with their shopping

More resources are needed to protect neighbourhood policing, says the Police Federation of England and Wales.

Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) has released the PEEL: Police effectiveness 2015 report, which graded every police force on its overall effectiveness in reducing crime and keeping people safe.

Will Riches, Vice Chair of the Police Federation, said in response to the report's findings: “We are glad that HMIC has recognised that neighbourhood policing is the cornerstone of crime prevention, given that this is something that the Federation and its members on the frontline have been saying for years.

“Neighbourhood policing has never been under so much threat, at a time when it is most needed. Neighbourhood policing is a new term for what we have always done, which is building trust and relationships with the community in order to succeed in tackling crime. It enables officers to serve the public, remain vigilant to threats and gain crucial intelligence, whether that be used in the fight against terror or child sexual exploitation.

Will Riches said: “Although Government promised to impose no further cuts in the Comprehensive Spending Review last November, following a long campaign by the Federation, what this report does not acknowledge is the cuts that have already had to be made during a climate of austerity, and the ones still in the pipeline this year. Unfortunately, all too often neighbourhood policing has been the casualty as valuable resources are diverted into other areas of work.

“We also note that HMIC has called for improvement in tackling 'so-called newer areas of crime, such as child sexual exploitation and cyber-crime’. Certainly, investigating child sexual exploitation relies heavily on obtaining information from communities and local professionals, and cyber-crime is soaring to previously unimaginable levels. These resources are going to have to come from somewhere – they cannot be culled from existing frontline neighbourhood policing, which is already being severely stretched.”

 

The report can be found on the  HMIC website